“Stay at home” clothes for a grown up me!

OK. I’ll admit that pajamas haven’t been in my wardrobe for a long time. I have but one pair of flannel bottoms that I pull out in the dead of winter. Other than that, it’s a bathrobe and my underwear. Hardly glamorous, and not for public viewing!

Now that we’re all spending a LOT more time at home (and who knows for how long), some real “staying at home” clothes just might be the next big thing. For me, the seed got planted by a post from @bradschultzdesigns on Instagram. I just love his stories and the amazingly fun clothes he makes. Anyway, he had a post about the dismal state of his “Covid isolation wear”, and it made me take a long hard look at mine. Mine, which is non-existent. I was making a jacket for a nephew’s wedding. Yes, that navy seersucker one. But when the wedding got cancelled (Thankfully!) I was adrift; and the jacket still needs buttons and buttonholes. But I have fallen so far off that bandwagon.

SO…..

Why not make real grownup men’s pajamas!

I picked up this vintage McCall’s pattern on Etsy. It’s from 1941. How amazing that something so fragile could last almost 80 years! Some of the pattern pieces have been repaired with old cellophane tape, and unfortunately someone has blacked out the sewist’s name on the front. I know I’m not the only one who finds those little features endearing. I’ve since traced the whole thing off onto Swedish Tracing Paper so that it can remain intact for another 80 years!

Vintage instructions. This is it, folks. A single sheet is all you get! The sewist (I think it’s safe to say a woman) in 1941 was expected to know a lot, and most likely did. Buttonholes would all be made by hand, and all the seams are flat felled. The sewist of this pattern was pretty savvy. I could tell by the way the pattern pieces were cut out that she had used the selvage along the fly, the waistband, cuffs and pocket band.

Here are some of the details. First…. the fabric. This is an Italian cotton shirting from Gorgeous Fabrics. If you could only feel how silky and cool it is. I feel like I’m wearing a Creamsicle! This pattern has such great details. A concealed button fly that was so easy to make. Dramatic cuffs that are worthy of Lord Grantham. A real sewn on waistband with double front pleats on the trousers. Yes, please! I had plenty of fabric left over so I made wide cuffs on the trouser bottoms as well. I love the extra weight they add. I did French seams for the legs, and bound the fly and back seam with a satin binding made with one of my Clovers bias gizmos.

Pattern adjustments — I did a sloped shoulder adjustment (for pajamas? I know, but that’s how I roll!). I took 2″ out of the trouser rise, 2″ out of the trouser length, and shortened the sleeves by 1″.

The facing is finished off with a satin Hong Kong finish. It adds less bulk than traditional binding and is SO easy. My piping is less than perfect, definitely a “practice makes perfect” technique which I want to work on.

seersucker shorty pj’s = SUMMER!

Suddenly I was on a roll….Same pattern with both a shorter top and bottom. I also rounded the collar and lapel to make the piping a little more manageable. Sooner or later we’re going to have some sultry Summer weather here in Maine, so this set has ZERO interfacing to keep them as light as possible. Again, fabric from Gorgeous Fabrics.

In case you missed my Instagram post…..Some parting shots in my best David Gandy (the pajama supermodel for Dolce and Gabbana) poses. Enjoy and laugh!

 

Can clothes be a life changer? Lifestyle changer? I’m beginning to think so, because I can’t wait to get into my new “stay at home wear” at the end of the day. It’s become a kind of treat that I give myself. Maybe there’s some in your future? I highly recommend it.

As always I appreciate all the support I get from the sewing community. Please stay safe and healthy during these uncertain times.

36 thoughts on ““Stay at home” clothes for a grown up me!

  1. Hmmm makes me look closer at the Closet Case women’s PJs – which folks rave about! – since yours are so spectacular! I see local barbers must be open now.😁 Thanks for the post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I did, but it’s not the right kind. My local JoAnn’s just had really thick stuff for upholstery. I had to go with a multi strand cord which I separated in half. It made for a rather lumpy piping. I’ve since found a supplier on Etsy and ordered a spool.

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      1. I’ve been happy with cotton kitchen string for small piping, though I imagine it would have to be preshrunk for clothes that go in the washer. Even, smooth, good density and cheap!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi. I must say you look very smart! I myself have been looking at my stay at home clothes, ie jim jams as we call them in the uk. Because I mostly wear them in the winter, I hope I’m not giving to much away 🙀they all tended to be brushed cotton. A bit warm at the moment so a cool cotton is definitely the order of the day. I have some great liberty prints in my stash so I’m hot footing it to my studio today. Lovely to read your blog again. It always brightens my day when I see your name pop up.

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  3. As always, your workmanship wows me. Your fabric choices bump your makes to a couture level. You have inspired this fellow Mainer to make some eye candy stay-at-home wear!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. What an inspiration! My husband could use some play clothes while telecommuting! Think I might be able to surprise him for his birthday?? Also, whoever does your photos here does a great job.

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      1. I guess I shouldn’t be surprised – your sewing is so good your photos should be the same! I always like them, and the thing that surprises me is the phone. Keep up the great work – I always love reading your posts.

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  5. fantastic pajamas, definitely a designer look. And I really appreciate those old patterns, I think they pack a lot of instruction and very good diagrams in a single sheet.

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  6. So grateful to leave a proper compliment with a real keyboard rather than IG and my thumbs. I relish every bit of these, the soft silky bias trim and the piping, particularly. I like to leave my pj piping flat, as I do sleep in my pj’s and someone that one lumpy bit is the thing keeping me from perfect slumber.

    You make me be a better sewist. Bless you. These photos are fab as well.

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  7. I’m a believer in changing into comfortable at-home wear as soon as we arrive home, and it’s nice to have some nice options. I still use my 70’s patterns for Pucci palazzo pajamas (now called jumpsuits) in washable fabrics. I live where it’s hot, so clothing sold as swimsuit coverups makes good summer at-home wear – like the cotton gauze dress I have on now. Your workmanship is an inspiration. Your dour poses are a hoot. My stretch velvet lounge suit in smoking jacket style has a short season because it’s polyester but I do recommend the style for chilly days.

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  8. I would think the high quality shirting you used would elicit the same sensation as getting between luxury sheets at night – what a temptation to make! P.S. The orange looks great on you!

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  9. Well, obviously I’m not the only one who thinks these are the cats pyjamas! Wouldn’t you want to go everywhere in them. I particularly love the orange ones. I don’t know the model but I love the smiley shot. Maybe modelling is a new career!

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